Should the West be nervous about Turkey’s close ties with Russia? | Politics

From: Inside Story

Ankara and Moscow are shoring up their cooperation as Russia faces isolation and sanctions.

Russia and Turkey are reported to have agreed on the supply of a second batch of S-400 missiles.

Turkey’s resolution in 2017 to buy the Russian air defence system was an indication of a deepening pragmatic – but sophisticated – relationship between Presidents Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Vladimir Putin.

Ankara continues to play what it calls a “balancing act” between Russia on one aspect, and NATO on the opposite.

However this doesn’t sit effectively with western international locations.

They’ve threatened to impose sanctions if Turkey continues to assist Russia evade sanctions over its warfare on Ukraine.

In order it wages warfare in Ukraine, how will Russia profit from the partnership?

Presenter: Kim Vinnell

Friends:

Maximilian Hess – Fellow on the International Coverage Analysis Institute and an knowledgeable in Eurasian affairs

Liudmila Samarskaia – Specialist within the up to date historical past of the Center East and a analysis fellow on the Institute of World Financial system and Worldwide Relations

Sinan Ulgen – Former Turkish diplomat and director of Edam, a think-tank that focuses on Turkey’s overseas, safety, financial and digital coverage

Rap against dictatorship In Thailand | Close Up | Entertainment News

From: Al Jazeera Close Up

Thai rapper Elevenfinger fights for Thailand’s protest motion in an try and convey reform to the nation.

“I rap about poverty and inequality so the surface world understands our hardships”, says 21-year-old Thai rapper Elevenfinger.

The younger musician from Klong Toey, Thailand’s largest slum, has risen to fame by means of his hard-hitting rap music exposing the internal grit of slum life and the struggles of these on the margins of society.

In 2020, the rapper joined 1000’s of younger folks defying the authorities by gathering within the streets and calling for reforms to the monarchy. Younger Thais like Elevenfinger have performed this regardless of a draconian legislation, lese-majeste, that forbids insults to the monarchy. These discovered responsible of breaking the legislation face 15 years in jail.

Elevenfinger’s struggles are met with swift repercussions as he accumulates arrests and a collection of courtroom circumstances that eat his time and forestall him from persevering with his efforts to convey change to a society notorious for its earnings disparity.